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Month: June 2020

The Biggest Lie in American History

The Biggest Lie in American History

As Americans hit the streets, and monuments to America’s racist past topple down, a growing number of people are waking up to the biggest lie in American history.  This country’s racist roots run deep, from Columbus to the Confederacy to Derek Chauvin.              Contrary to American myth, the United States was not conceived in liberty and it has never fully committed itself to the principle that “all men are created equal.”  The United States was built on stolen Native American…

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Let’s Protect Conawaugus

Let’s Protect Conawaugus

Last week I published an essay in the Livingston County News about the threats posed to the Seneca town of Conawaugus by a proposed solar development project planned by a company called Horseshoe Solar. Based on my visit to the site, it looks like construction is already under way, and it is being done without the consent of the Seneca Nation of Indians or the Tonawanda Seneca Nation, both of which have claims to the lands in question. Unfortunately, I…

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What You Need to Read, June 2020

What You Need to Read, June 2020

You have finished a rough semester. Libraries are still closed. Some interlibrary loan services are available, and school will return in some form in the fall. Here is your summer reading list to help keep you up to date on what is coming out in Native American History. Adams, Mikaela Morgan. “‘A Very Serious and Perplexing Epidemic of Grippe,’: The Influenza Epidemic of 1918 at the Haskell Institute,” American Indian Quarterly, 44 (Winter 2020), 1-35. Bates, Denise E. Basket Diplomacy:…

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The Donald and the Missing Girls

The Donald and the Missing Girls

Well, that did not take long. Last week I published a piece in the Syracuse newspaper giving the Trump Administration qualified credit for appointing a task force, dubbed “Operation Lady Justice,” directed at addressing the problem of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and for issuing a proclamation making May 5th “Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives Awareness Day.“ At a listening session yesterday, the Trump Administration unsurprisingly demonstrated that its real commitment to the issue is…

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Musings of an Inebriated Historian

Musings of an Inebriated Historian

Being a historian in a world so full of needless suffering sometimes feels like a sentence to despair and hopelessness. I am not the first historian to feel this way. A long time ago the American historian Clarence Walworth Alvord looked out a world ravaged by the first Great War and wrote an essay entitled “Musings of an Inebriated Historian.” Historians, he noted, for a generation had celebrated “progress.” They assumed civilization emerged from and prevailed over barbarism, the arc…

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