Category Archives: New Publications

What You Need to Read, September 2022

It has a been a busy summer, and now classes are back in full swing. The biggest news I have is the imminent publication of the third edition of Native America with my co-author Peter Jakob Olsen-Harbich. Copies should be available soon

Andersson, Rani-Henrik. Lakota: An Indigenous History, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Arista, Noelani. The Kingdom and the Republic: Sovereign Hawai’I and the Early United States, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022).

Bentley, Matthew and John Bloom. The Imperial Gridiron: Manhood, Civilization, and Football at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Berthelette, Scott. “Les Sçioux n’étoient bons qu’á manger’: La Colle and the Anishinaabeg-Dakota War, 1730-1742,” Ethnohistory 69 (2022), 1-27.

Blackhawk, Ned. The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of US History, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2022).

De Jong, David H. Paternalism to Partnership: The Administration of Indian Affairs, 1786-2021, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Dowd, Gregory Evans. “Indigenous Self-Vanishing? Relating the North American ‘Iroquois Wars’ and the South African Mfecane,” William and Mary Quarterly 79 (July 2022), 393-424

Dubcovsky, Alejandra. Talking Back: Native Women and the Making of the Early South, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2022).

Geiger, Andrea.  Converging Empires: Native Craftwork and the Art of American Literatures, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2022).

Gross, Richard. “Native Villages of La Salle’s Illinois Country,” Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, 115 (Spring 2022), 33-65.

Haggard, Dixie Ray. “The First Invasion of Georgia and the Myth of Westo Power, 1656-1684,” Journal of Military History, 86 (July 2022), 533-556.

Hall, Ryan. “Chaos and Conquest: The Civil War and Indigenous Crisis on the Upper Missouri,” Journal of the Civil War Era, 12 (June 2022), 147-172.

Hämäläinen, Pekka. Indigenous Continent: A New History of America, (New York: Norton, 2022).

Huebner, Karen L. “’Brother, After this Conduct, Can You Blame Me?’ The Echo of Native American Memory of the 1782 Massacre at Gnadenhutten,” Journal of the Early Republic, 42 (Spring 2022), 1-30.

Klein, Alan. “the Great gathering: Lakota Basketball as a Site of Cultural Production,” American Indian Quarterly, 46 (Winter/Spring 2022), 1-24.

Kramer, Erin. “’That She Shall Be Forever Banished from this Country’: Alcohol, Sovereignty, and Social Segregation in New Netherland,” Early American Studies, 20 (Winter 2022), 3-42.

Little, J. I.  “The In-Between World of a Coast Salish Shaman: Charlie Wilson/Chliraminset of Kuper (Penelakut) Island, British Columbia, 1880-1904,” Social history/Histoire Social 55 (May 2022), 49-69.

McGrath, Ann, Laura Rademaker and Jakelin Troy, Everywhen: Australia and the Language of Deep History (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2023).

Marsh, Dawn G., “The Coming Out Place,” Indiana Magazine of History 118 (March 2022), 1-40.

Meyer, Sabine N. Native Removal Writing: Narratives of Peoplehood, Politics and Law, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar and Philip J. Deloria, eds., The Great Sioux Nation: Sitting in Judgment on America, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Oskison, John M. Unconquerable: The Story of John Ross, Chief of the Cherokees, 1828-1866, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Pawlicki, Sarah. “’I Hear that God Saith Work’: Wunnampuhtogig and  Puritans Laboring for Grace in Massachusetts, 1643-1653,” Early American Studies, 20 (Spring 2022), 189-214.

Pigeon, Emilie and Carolyn Podruchny, “Bannock Diplomacy: How Metis Women Fought Battles and Made Peace in North Dakota, 1850s-1870s,” Ethnohistory, 69 (2022), 29-52.

Pluymers, Keith. No Wood, No Kingdom: Political Ecology in the English Atlantic, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022).

Ress, David.  “Autonomy, Not Assimilation: Waban and the Praying Indian Political Experiment in the Massachusetts Bay Colony,” Australasian Journal of American Studies, 41 (July 2022), 27-58

Rizzo-Martinez, Martin.  We Are not Animals: Indigenous Politics of Survival, Rebellion and Reconstitution in Nineteenth Century California, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Smyth, Noel E. “The Obfuscation of Native American Presence in the French Atlantic: Natchez Indians in Saint Domingue, 1731-1791,” Ethnohistory, 69 (July 2022), 263-285.

Stanciu, Christina. The Makings and Unmakings of Americans: Indians and Immigrants in American Literature and Culture, 1879-1924, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2022).

Stone, Erin Woodruff. Captives of Conquest: Slavery in the Early Modern Spanish Caribbean, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022).

Szabo, Joyce M. Reimagining History from an Indigenous Perspective: The Graphic Work of Floyd Solomon, (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2022).

Weaver, Jace and Laura Adams Weaver. Red Clay, 1835, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2022).

Westman, Clinton N. Cree and Christian: Encounters and Transformations, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

What You Need To Read, June 2022

It has been a brutal couple of weeks. The news is all bad. Fires are burning in the west and its still early. But at least our brothers and sisters working in the field of Native American history are remaining productive. This is your latest quarterly bibliography of stuff that I think is worth your attention. Please note, about 2/3 of the way down this list, that the third edition of Native America, co-authored this time with Peter Jakob Olsen-Harbich, will be released this fall.

Barnes, Benjamin J. and Stephen Warren, Replanting Cultures: Community-Engaged Scholarship in Indian Country, (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2022).

Bennett, Cheryl Redhorse. Our Fight Has Just Begun: Hate Crimes and Justice in Native America, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2022)

Bentley, Matthew and John Bloom, The Imperial Gridiron: Manhood, Civilization and Football at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Berthelette, Scott. “’Les Scioux n’étoient bons qu’a manger’: LaColle and the Anisinaabeg-Dakota War, 1730-1742,” Ethnohistory, 69 (No. 1, 2022), 1-27.

Blansett, Kent and Cathleen D. Cahill, Indian Cities: Histories of Indigenous Urbanization, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Bold, Christine. “Vaudeville Indians” on Global Circuits, 1880s to 1930s, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2022).

Burge, Daniel J. “Genocidal Jesting: The ‘Comic Indian” in US Popular Culture, 1850-1900,” Pacific Historical Review, 91 (Spring 2022), 163-189.

Chakraborty, Tuhin. “Michigan Indian Education Before and After 1934: From Oppression to Neglect,” Michigan Historical Review, 48 (Spring 2022), 63-80.

Daggar, Lori J. Cultivating Empire: Capitalism, Philanthropy and the Negotiation of American Imperialism in Indian Country, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022).

DeJong, David H. Paternalism to Partnership: The Administration of Indian Affairs, 1786-2021, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Erlandson, Jon, Robert L. DeLong, and Kelly M. Robertson, “Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) bones from a 5850 Year Old Shell Midden on San Miguel Island, California, USA,” Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology, 17 (January-March 2022), 142-151.

Feller, Laura J. Being Indigenous in Jim Crow Virginia: Powhatan People and the Color Line, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Geiger, Andrea. Converging Empires: Citizens and Subjects in the North Pacific Borderlands, 1867-1945, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2022).

Hill, James L. Creek Internationalism in an Age of Revolution, 1763-1818, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Hodge, Adam. “Tradition, Sovereignty and Conservation: The Controversy Surrounding the Wind River Indian Reservation Game Code,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Winter 2021), 369-391.

Huebner, Karin L. “’Brother, after this conduct, Can You Blame Me?’: The Echo of Native American Memory of the 1782 Massacre at Gnadenhutten,” Journal of the Early Republic, 42 (Spring 2022), 1-30.

Hugill, David. Settler Colonial City: Racism and Inequity in Postwar Minneapolis, (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2021).

Iati, Noelle Marie. “’The Doors of Immorality were Set Wide Open by State Authority’: Violence Against Indigenous Women in the Jacksonian Southeast, 1830-1840,” Essays in History 54 (2022), 1-25.

Jurss, Jacob. “Relations Across the Lands: Ojibwe and Dakota Interactions in the Indigenous Borderlands of the Western Great Lakes,” America Indian Quarterly, 45 (Fall 2021), 307-335.

Kelton, Paul. “Pandemic Injustice: Irish Immigrant, Enslaved African American, and Choctaw Experiences with Cholera in 1832,” Journal of Southern History, 88 (February 2022), 73-110.

Kruer, Matthew. Time of Anarchy: Indigenous Power and the Crisis of Colonialism in Early America, (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2021).

Krupat, Arnold. From the Boarding Schools: Apache Indian Students Speak, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2023).

Lambert, Valerie. Native Agency: Indians in the Bureau of Indian Affairs, (St. Paul: University of Minnesota Press, 2022).

McGrath, Ann, Laura Rademaker and Jakelin Troy, eds., Everywhen: Australia and the Language of Deep History, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2023).

Meadows, William C. “Kiowa at the Battle of the Washita, 27 November 1868,” Ethnohistory, 68 (October 2021), 519-545.

Meyer, Sabine N. Native Removal Writing: Narratives of Peoplehood, Politics and Law, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Morrow, Julie. “Adapting Against Assimilation: Recovering Anishinaabe Student Writings in Carlisle Indian School Periodicals, 1904-1918,” Australasian Journal of American Studies, 40 (December 2021), 71-101.

Oberg, Michael Leroy and Peter Jakob Olsen-Harbich, Native America: A History, 3rd ed., (Malden, MA: Wiley, 2022).

Odle, Mairin. Under the Skin: Tattoos, Scalps, and the Contested Language of Bodies in Early America, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2022).

Oskison, John M. Unconquerable: The Story of John Ros, Chief of the Cherokees, 1828-1866, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Pawlicki, Sarah. “’I hear that God Saith Work’: Wunnampuhtogig and Puritans Laboring for Grace in Massachusetts, 1643-1653,” Early American Studies, 20 (Spring 2022), 189-214.

Pigeon, Emilie and Carolyn Podruchny, “Bannock Diplomacy: How Metis Women Fought Battles and Made Peace in North Dakota, 1850s-1870s,” Ethnohistory 69 (Issue 1, 2022), 29-52.

Radding, Cynthia. Bountiful Deserts: Sustaining Indigenous Worlds in Northern New Spain, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2022).

Richwine, Lindsay. “Comity at the Crossroads: How Friendships between Moravian and Native Women Sustained the Moravian Mission at Shamokin, 1745-1755,” Pennsylvania History 89 (Winter 2022), 1-29.

Simpson, Leanne Betasamosake, Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies, (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2022).

Smith, A. Lynn. Memory Wars: Settlers and Natives Remember Washington’s Sullivan Expedition of 1779, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2023).

Smithers, Gregory D. Reclaiming Two-Spirits: Sexuality, Spiritual Renewal, and Sovereignty in Native America, (Boston: Beacon, 2022).

Snyder, Christina. “Many Removals: Re-evaluating the Arc of Indigenous Dispossession,” Journal of the Early Republic, 41 (Winter 2021), 1-29.

Vaught, Sabina, Bryan McKinley, Jones Brayboy, and Jeremiah Chin. The School Prison Trust, (St. Paul: University of Minnesota Press, 2022).

Weaver, Jace and Laura Adams Weaver, Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2022).

Wright, Miller Shores. “Matrilineal Management: How Creek Women and Matrilineages Shaped Distinct Forms of Racialized Slavery in Creek Country at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century,” Journal of Southern History, 88 (February 2022), 39-72.

What You Need To Read, March 2022

Here is your latest quarterly bibliography in Native American and Indigenous History. It has been a busy and distressing first few months of 2022. I am sure I have forgotten or overlooked some important works, so please reach out and let me know what I may have missed. I hope you find this helpful. Stay in touch and stay safe.

Barnes, Chief Benjamin J. and Stephen Warren, Replanting Cultures: Community-Engaged Scholarship in Indian Country, (Albany: SUNY Press, 2022).

Beck, Paul N. Inkpaduta: Dakota Leader, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Bennett, Cheryl Redhorse. Our Fight Has Just Begun: Hate Crimes and Justice in Native America, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2022).

Berthelette, Scott. “‘Les Scioux n’etoient bons qu’a manger’: La Colle and the Anishinaabeg-Dakota War, 1730-1742,” Ethnohistory 69 (January 2022), 1-27.

Bigart, Robert J. Providing for the People: Economic Change among the Salish and Kootenai Indians, 1875-1910, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Blansett, Kent, Cathleen Cahill and Andrew Needham, eds., Indian Cities: Histories of Indigenous Urbanization, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Braund, Kathleen Holland, ed. The Attention of a Traveler: Essays on William Bartram’s ‘Travels’ and Legacy, (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2022).

Bruyneel, Kevin. Settler Memory: The Disavowal of Indigeneity and the Politics of Race in the United States, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021)

Castaneda, Terri A. Marie Mason Potts: The Lettered Life of a California Indian Activist, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Conrad, Paul. The Apache Diaspora: Four Centuries of Displacement and Survival, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021).

Dennis, Matthew. “‘Ours from the Top to the Very Bottom’: Seneca Land, Colonial Development, Proto-Conservation, and Resistance in the Early American Republic,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 44 (no. 1, 2020).

Feller, Laura Janet. Being Indigenous in Jim Crow Virginia: Powhatan People and the Color Line, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Greene, Lance. Their Determination to Remain: A Cherokee Community’s Resistance to the Trail of Tears in North Carolina, (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2022).

Haake, Claudia Bettina. “A Duty to Protect and Respect: Seneca Opposition to Incorporation During the Removal Period,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 44 (no. 4, 2020), 21-40.

Heninge, David. Numbers from Nowhere: The American Indian Population Debate, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Hodge, Adam R. “Tradition, Sovereignty, and Conservation: The Controversy Surrounding the Wind River Indian Reservation Game Code,” Western Historical Quarterly 63 (Winter 2021), 369-391.

Hugill, David. Settler Colonial City: Racism and Inequity in Postwar Minneapolis, (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2021).

Hunter, Douglas. The Place of Stone: Dighton Rock and the Erasure of America’s Indigenous Past (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Isaacs, Sandra Muse. Eastern Cherokee Stories: A Living Oral Tradition and its Cultural Continuance, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Margaret Jacobs. After One Hundred Winters: In Search of Reconciliation on America’s Stolen Lands, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2021).

Jones, David S. Rationalizing Epidemics: Meanings and Uses of American Indian Mortality Since 1600, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2022).

Jurss, Jacob. “Relations Across the Lands: Ojibwe and Dakota Interactions in the Indigenous Borderlands of the Western Great Lakes,” American Indian Quarterly, 45 (Fall 2021), 307-335.

Justice, Daniel Heath and Jean M. O’Brien, eds., Allotment Stories: Indigenous Land Relations Under Settler Siege, (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2021).

Kelton, Paul. “Pandemic Injustice: Irish Immigrant, Enslaved African American, and Choctaw Experiences with Cholera in 1832,” Journal of Southern History 88 (February 2022), 73-110.

Kramer, Erin. “‘That She Shall Be Forever Banished from this Country’: Alcohol, Sovereignty, and Social Segregation in New Netherland,” Early American Studies, 20 (Winter 2022), 3-42.

LaPier, Rosalyn. “Ella Mad Plume Yellow Wolf: Photographs by a Native American Woman in the Early 1940s,” Montana: The Magazine of Western History 71 (Winter 2021), 25-41.

LaPointe, Sasha taqwseblu. Red Paint: The Ancestral Autobiography of a Coast Salish Punk, (Berkeley: Counterpoint, 2022).

Lewis, Bonnie Sue. Creating Christian Indians: Native Clergy in the Presbyterian Church, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Marsh, Dawn. “The Coming Out Place,” Indiana Magazine of HIstory 118 (March 2022), 1-40.

Meadows, William C. Kiowa Military Societies: Ethnohistory and Ritual, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Meadows, William C. “Kiowa at the Battle of Washita, 27 November 1868,” Ethnohistory 68 (October 2021), 519-545.

Meyer, Sabine. Native Removal Writing: Narratives of Peoplehood, Politics and Law, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2022).

Millett, Nathaniel. “Law, Lineage, Gender, and the Lives of Enslaved Indigenous People on the Edge of the Nineteenth-Century Caribbean,” William and Mary Quarterly 78 (October 2021), 687-720.

Morrow, Julie. “Adapting Against Assimilation: Recovering Anishinaabe Student Writings from Carlisle Indian School Periodicals, 1904-1918,” Australasian Journal of American Studies 40 (December 2021), 71-102.

Nelson, John William. “Sigenauk’s War of Independence: Anishinaabe Resurgence and the Making of Indigenous Authority in the Borderlands of Revolution,” William and Mary Quarterly 78 (October 2021), 653-686,

Nielsen, Marianne O. and Barbara M. Heather, Finding Right Relations: Quakers, Native Americans and Settler Colonialism, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2022).

Pigeon, Emilie and Carolyn Podruchny, “Bannock Diplomacy: How Metis Women Fought Battles and Made Peace in North Dakota, 1850s-1870s,” Ethnohistory 69 (January 2022), 29-52.

Richwine, Lindsay. “Comity at the Crossroads: How Friendships Between Moravian and Native Women Sustained the Moravian Mission at Shamokin, 1714-1755,” Pennsylvania History, 89 (Winter 2022), 1-29.

Rizzo-Martinez. Martin. We Are Not Animals: Indigenous Politics of Survival, Rebellion, and Reconstitution in Nineteenth-Century California, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Roberts, Alaina E. I’ve Been Here All The While: Black Freedom on Native Land, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021).

Simpson, Leanne Betasamosake. As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance, (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2021).

Smiles, Deondre. “Erasing Indigenous History, Then and Now,” Current Events in Historical Perspective, 15 (October 2021), 1-24.

Smithers, Gregory D. Reclaiming Two-Spirits: Sexuality, Spiritual Renewal, and Sovereignty in Native America, (Boston: Beacon Press, 2022).

Snyder, Christina. “Many Removals: Re-Evaluating the Arc of Indigenous Dispossession,” Journal of the Early Republic 41 (Winter 2021), 1-29.

Teuton, Christopher B. Cherokee Earth Dwellers: Stories and Teachings of the Natural World, (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2022).

Tongkeamha, Henrietta and Raymond Tongkeamha. Stories from Saddle Mountain: Autobiographies of a Kiowa Family, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021).

Williams, Samantha M. Assimilation, Resilience, and Surival: A History of the Stewart Indian School, 1890-1920 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2022).

Witgen. Michael John. Seeing Red: Indigenous Land, American Expansion, and the Political Economy of Plunder in North America, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2022).

Wright, Miller Shores. “Matrilineal Management: How Creek Women and Matrilineages Shaped Distinct Forms of Racialized Slavery in Creek Country at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century,” Journal of Southern History 88 (February 2022), 39-72.

What You Need To Read, December 2021

This is the final week of classes at Geneseo before finals next week. It has been a trying school year for many of us. Nonetheless I completed a few things. Peter Olsen-Harbich and I completed the third edition of Native America and submitted it to our publisher at Wiley. We expect to see it in print and e-book in time for the fall semester in 2022. That means this is the first bibliography that will be considered for the fourth edition of the book, if and when we get around to doing that work. Before we get to that, a long-awaited sabbatical, during which I hope to make a great deal of progress on my next book, a history of the Onondaga Nation. As always, if you think there is something missing here, please let me know and I will run down the cite. Have a good end of the school year.

Akins, Damon B. and William J. Bauer, Jr., We Are the Land: A History of Native California, (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2021).

Biolsi, Thomas. “The Treaty Imaginary and Tribal Sovereignty in South Dakota,” American Indian Quarterly 45 (Summer 2021), 209-249.

Clements, Christopher. “’There is no trouble at all if the state would keep out’: Indigenous People and New York’s Carceral State,” Journal of American History, 108 (September 2021) 296-319.

Dyck, Erika and Maureen Lux. “Population Control in the Global North? Canada’s Response to Indigenous Reproductive Rights and Neo-Eugenics,” Canadian Historical Review,102 (August 2021), 876-902.

Fisher, Julie A. “Roger Williams and the Indian Business,” New England Quarterly, 50 (September 2021), 552-571.

Haake, Claudia Bettina. “A Duty to Protect and Respect: Seneca Opposition to Incorporation during the Removal Period,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 44 (2020), 21-40.

Haider, Mellie and Manuel P. Teodoro, “Environmental Federalism in Indian Country: Sovereignty, Primacy, and Environmental Protection,” Policy Studies Journal, 49 (August 2021), 887-908.

Hart, William B. “For the Good of Their Souls”: Performing Christianity in Eighteenth Century Mohawk Country, (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2021).

Hoy, Benjamin.  A Line of Blood and Dirt: Creating the Canada-United States Border Across Indigenous Lands, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2021).

Hausmann, Stephen R. “Erasing Indian Country: Urban Native Space and the 1972 Rapid City Flood,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Autumn 2021), 305-329.

Kherag, Sean. “Against the Current and into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park,” BC Studies, 211 (Autumn 2021), 131-143.

Meadows, William C. “Kiowa at the Battle of the Washita, 27 November 1868,” Ethnohistory, 68 (October 2021), 519-545.

Mize, Jamie Myers. “’To Conclude on a General Union’: Masculinity, the Chickamauga, and Pan-Indian Alliances in the Revolutionary Era,” Ethnohistory, 68 (July 2021), 429-448.

Mohlman, Nicholas K. “Making a Massacre: The 1622 Virginia ‘massacre,’ Violence and the Virginia Company of London’s Corporate Speech,” Early American Studies, 19 (Summer 2021), 419-156.

Nelson, Peter. “Where Have All the Anthros Gone? The Shift in California Indian Studies form Research ‘on’ to Research ‘with, for, and by’ Indigenous Peoples,” American Anthropologist, 123 (September 2021), 469-473.

Nesper, Larry. Our Relations…the Mixed Bloods: Indigenous Transformation and Dispossession in the Western Great Lakes, (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2021).

Nichols, David A. “A Note on Economic Depressions and Native American Opportunities,”  Indiana Magazine of History, 117 (September 2021), 157-168.

Phillips, Katrina M. Staging Indigeneity: Salvage Tourism and the Performance of Native American History, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Pustet, Regina. Lakota Texts: Narratives of Lakota Life and Culture in the Twentieth Century, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021).

Reed, Julie. Serving the Nation: Cherokee Sovereignty and Social Welfare, 1800-1907, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Ridner, Judith. “Archibald Loudon and the Politics of Print and Indian-Hating in the Early Republic,” Early American Studies, 19 (Summer 2021), 528-567.

Rizzo-Martinez, Martin. We Are Not Animals: Indigenous Politics of Survival, Rebellion, and Reconstitution in Nineteenth-Century California, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021).

Roberts, Alaina. “When Black Lives Matter Meets Indian Country: Using the Cherokee and Chickasaw Nations as Case Studies for Understanding the Evolution of Public History and Interracial Coalition,” American Indian Quarterly, 45 (Summer 2021), 250-271.

Shefveland, Kristalyn Marie. “Pocahontas and Settler Memory in the Appalachian West and South,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Autumn 2021), 281-303.

Sutton, Victoria. Decolonizing the Foundations of American Indian Law, (Lubbock: Texas tech University Press, 2021).

Tongkeamha, Henrietta, et al., Stories from Saddle Mountain: Autobiographies of a Kiowa Family, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021).

Tucker, Patrick M. “Savage Barbarity: Native American Uncivilized (Guerilla) Warfare at Cold Creek in the Firelands of Ohio during the War of 1812,” Ohio History, 128 (Fall 2021), 1-22.

Verbeek, Vincent.  “A Dissonant Education: Marching Bands and Indigenous Musical Traditions at Sherman Institute, 1901-1940,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 44 (2020), 41-58.

Witgen, Michael John.  Seeing Red: Indigenous Land, American Expansion, and the Political Economy of Plunder in North America, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Wotherspoon, Terry, and Emily Milne. “’Errors were Made:’ Public Attitudes Regarding Reconciliation and Education in Canada,” Canadian Review of Sociology, 58 (August 2021), 306-326.

Yarbrough, Fay A. Choctaw Confederates: The American Civil War in Indian Country, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

What You Need To Read, September 2021

I am back in front of the classroom for the first time since March of 2020. It is a busy and exciting time on campus. If you find some time amidst all the adjustments required by a new school year, here is some of the scholarly work that I think might be worth your time. Enjoy, and if there is something you noticed that I missed, please send it along and I will update the list.

Bakken, Dawn E. “The Attempted Potawatomi Removal of 1839,” Indiana Magazine of History, 117 (September 2021), 169-207.

Baumgartner, Alice L. “The Massacre at Gracias a Dios: Mobility and Violence on the Lower Rio Grande, 1821-1856,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Spring 2021), 35-58.

Bigart, Robert and Joseph McDonald, `We Want Freedom and Citizenship’: Documents of Salish, Pend d’Oreille, and Kootenai Indian History, 1912-1920, (Pablo, MT: Salish Kootenai College Press, 2021).

Boxell, Mark. “From Native Sovereignty to an Oilman’s State: Land, Race, and Petroleum in Indian Territory and Oklahoma,” Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 20 (April 2021), 216-233.

Britten, Thomas A. “Termination by Decentralization? Native American Responss to Federal Regional Councils, 1969-1983,” American Indian Quarterly, 45 (Spring 2021), 121-151.

Bruyneel, Kevin. Settler Memory: The Disavowal of Indigeneity and the Politics of Race in the United States, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Cevasco, Carla. “`Nothing Which Hunger Will Not Devour’: Disgust and Sustenance in the Northeastern Borderlands,” Early American Studies, 19 (Spring 2021), 264-293.

Conrad, Paul. The Apache Diaspora: Four Centuries of Displacement and Survival, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021).

Cothran, Boyd. “Between Civilization and Savagery: How Reconstruction Era Federal Indian Policy Led to Indian Wars,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Summer 2021), 167-188.

Dinwoodie, Jane. “Evading Indian Removal in the American South.” Journal of American History, 108 (June 2021), 17-41.

Estreicher, Justin. “`Unoccupied and of a Valuable Kind’: The George Gold Rush and Manufactured Cherokee Savagery,” Georgia Historical Quarterly, 105 (no. 2, 2021), 87-119.

Fisher, Dennis Leo. “War, Wampum and Recognition: Algonquin Transborder Political Activism during the Early Twentieth Century, 1919-1931.” American Indian Quarterly, 45 (Winter 2021), 56-79.

Hausman, Stephen R. “Erasing Indian Country: Urban Native Space and the 1972 Rapid City Flood,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Autumn 2021), 305-329.

Hill, Matthew E. and Lauren W. Ritterbush, People in a Sea of Grass: Archaeology’s Changing Perspectives on Indigenous Plains Communities, (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 2021).

Horn, James P. P., A Brave and Cunning Prince: The Great Chief Opechancanough and the War for America, (New York: Basic Books, 2021).

Hoy, Benjamin.  A Line of Blood and Dirt: Creating the Canada-United States Border Across Indigenous Lands, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2021).

Hudson, Angela Pulley. “The Indian Doctress in the Nineteenth-Century United States: Race, Medicine, and Labor,” Journal of Social History, 54 (Summer 2021), 1160-1187.

Kalweit, Andrew, Marc Clark and Jamie Ishcomer-Aazami, “Determinants of Racial Misclassification in COVID-19 Mortality Data: The Role of Funeral Directors and Social Context,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 44 (no. 3, 2020), 15-36.

Kennedy, Brenden Edward.  “Mississippi Stocks and the 1795 Yazoo Land Sale: Slavery, Securities Markets, Native American Dispossession, and the Panic of 1819 in Alabama,” Alabama Review, 74 (July 2021), 1-38.

Krischer, Elana. “Seneca Conceptions of Land Use and Value: Debates over Land Sovereignty, 1797-1848,” Journal of the Early Republic, 41 (Fall 2021), 373-401.

LaCombe, Michael A. “`To the end that you may the better perceive these things to be true’: Credibility and Ralph Hamor’s A True Discourse of the Present Estate of Virginia,” Early American Studies, 19 (Spring 2021), 294-321.

Lentis, Marinella. Colonized Through Art: American Indian Schools and Art Education, 1889-1915, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021).

Mackenthun, Gesa and Christen Mucher, Decolonizing Prehistory: Deep Time and Indigenous Knowledges in Noth America, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2021).

Mihesuah, Devon A. Ned Christie: The Creation of an Outlaw and a Cherokee Hero, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Mize, Jamie Myers. “’To Conclude on a General Union’: Masculinity, the Chickamauga, and Pan-Indian Alliances in the Revolutionary Era,” Ethnohistory, 68 (July 2021), 429-448.

Montgomery, Lindsay M. “A Rejoinder to Body Bags: Indigenous Resilience and Epidemic Disease, from COVID-19 to First ‘Contact’,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 44 (no. 3., 2020), 65-86.

Nesper, Larry, Amorin Mellow and Michael S. Wiggins, Our Relations…the Mixed Bloods: Indigenous Transformation and Dispossession in the Western Great Lakes, (Albany: SUNY Press, 2021).

Newman, Paul Douglas. “The `Four Nations of Indians upon the Susquehanna’: Mid-Atlantic Murder, Diplomacy, and Political Identity, 1717-1723,” Pennsylvania History, 88 (Summer 2021), 287-318.

Nichols, David A. “Potawatomi Resistance, Renewal, and Removal,” Indiana Magazine of History, 117 (June 2021), 65-81.

Oberg, Michael Leroy. “The Way Things Matter,” Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 20 (April 2021), 330-332.

Pearl, Chris. “Becoming Patriots: The Struggle for Inclusion and Exclusion on Pennsylvania’s Revolutionary Frontier,” Pennsylvania History,  88 (Summer 2021), 362-401.

Pointer, Richard W. Pacifist Prophet: Papunhank and the Quest for Peace in Early America, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Rindfleisch, Bryan C. Brothers of Coweta: Kinship, Empire and Revolution in the Eighteenth-Century Muscogee World, (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2021).

Sabo, George. Ways of the Ancestors: Ancient Indians of Arkansas, (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2021).

Seeley, Samantha.  Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the United States, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Shuck-Hall, Sheri Marie.  Journey to the West: The Alabama and Coushatta Indians,  (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Spindler, John E. “Slaughter in the Snow,” Military Heritage, 22 (Winter 2021), 62-71.

Tongkeamha, Henrieta, et al., Stories from Saddle Mountain: Autobiographies of a Kiowa Family, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021).

Usner, Daniel H. “Chitimacha Diplomacy and Commerce in Colonial Louisiana,” Louisiana History, 62 (Spring 2021), 133-176.

Webster, Rebecca M. “The Wisconsin Oneida and the WPA” Stories of Corn, Colonialism, and Revitalizaation,” Ethnohistory, 68 (July 2021), 407-427.

Wickman, Thomas. “Our Best Places: Gender, Food Sovereignty, and Miantonomi’s Kin on the Connecticut River,” Early American Studies, 19 (Spring 2021), 215-263.

Yarbrough, Fay A. Choctaw Confederates: The American Civil War in Indian Country, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

What You Need To Read, June 2021

I hope you all are settling into your summer routines, and that this summer is better for you than last year. Here is your quarterly bibliography of new and interesting work I will be consulting as I work with Peter Olsen-Harbich to revise and produce a third edition of Native America.

Anderson, Mark R.  Down the Warpath to the Cedars: Indians’ First Battles in the Revolution, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Baumgartner, Alice L. “The Massacre at Gracias a Dios: Mobility and Violence on the Lower Rio Grande, 1821-1856,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Spring 2021), 35-58.

Boxell, Mark.  “From Native Sovereignty to an Oilman’s State: Land, Race, and Petroleum in Indian Territory and Oklahoma,” Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 20 (April 2021), 216-233.

Burch, Susan.  Committed: Remembering Native Kinship in and Beyond Institutions, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Cevasco, Carla.  “’Nothing Which Hunger Will Not Devour’: Disgust and Sustenance in the Northeastern Borderlands,” Early American Studies, 19 (Spring 2021), 264-293.

Conrad, Paul.  The Apache Diaspora: Four Centuries of Displacement and Survival. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021).


Cothran, Boyd.  “Between Civilization and Savagery: How Reconstruction Era Frederal Indian Policy Led to the Indian Wars,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Summer 2021), 167-188.

Eustace, Nicole.  Covered with Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America, (New York: Liveright, 2021).

Fisher, Dennis Leo.  “War, Wampum, and Recognition: Algonquin Transborder Political Activism during the Early Twentieth Century, 1919-1931,” American Indian Quarterly, 45 (Winter 2021), 56-79.

Harjo, Joy.  Living Nations, Living Words: An Anthology of First Peoples Poetry, (New York: Norton, 2021).

Helfrich, Joel T. “No More Nations within Nations: Indigenous Sovereignty after the End of Treaty Making in 1871,” Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 20 (April 2021).

Jones, Charlotte.  “Conveyors of Creolization: Animal Husbandry Practices in Louisiana, 1716-1822,” Louisiana History, 62 (Winter 2021), 33-60.

Kane, Katie.  “Art, Indigenous Sovereignty, and Resistance in the Age of Big Oil: Corwin Clairont’s Two-Headed Arrow/The Tar Sands Project,” American Indian Quarterly, 45 (Spring 2021), 152-195.

Kantrowitz, Stephen.  “Jurisdiction, Civilization, and the Ends of Native American Citizenship: The View from 1866,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Summer 2021), 189-208.

Kassabaum, Megan C.  A History of Platform Mound Ceremonialism: Finding Meaning in Elevated Ground, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2021).

Keeler, Jacqueline.  Standoff: Standing Rock, the Bundy Movement, and the America Story of Sacred Lands, (Salt Lake City: Torrey House Press, 2021).

King, Farina, Michael P. Taylor and James Swenson, eds., Returning Home: Diné Creative Works from the Intermountain Indian School, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2021).

LaCombe, Michael A. “’To the End that You May Better Perceive these Things to be True’: Credibility and Ralph Hamor’s True Discourse of the Present Estate of Virginia,” Early American Studies, 19 (Spring 2021), 294-321.

Mantegani, Joseph.  “Slouching Towards Autonomy: Reenvisioning Tribal Jurisdiction, Native American Autonomy, and Violence Against Women in Indian Country,” Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 111 (Spring 2021), 315-350.

Moats, Sandra.  Navigating Neutrality: Early American Governance in the Turbulent Atlantic, (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2021).

Oberg, Michael Leroy.  “The Way Things Matter,” Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 20 (April 2021), 330-332.

Owens, Robert M.  “Indian Wars” and the Struggle for Eastern North America, 1763-1842, (New York: Routledge, 2021).

Peeples, Matthew A. Connected Communities: Networks, Identity, and Social Change in the Ancient Cibola World, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2021).

Pesantubbee, Michelene E., Native Foodways: Indigenous North American Religious Traditions and Foods, (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2021).

Reid, Gerald F.  Chief Thunderwater: An Unexpected Indian in Unexpected Places, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021)

Strang, Cameron.  “Pursuing Knowledge, Surviving Empire: Indigenous Explorers in the Removal Era,” William and Mary Quarterly, 78 (April 2021), 281-312

Taylor, Alan.  American Republics: A Continental History of the United States, 1783-1850, (New York: Norton, 2021).

Toler, Lorraine Updike. “The Missing Indian Affairs Clause,” University of Chicago Law Review, 88 (March 2021), 413-486.

Tsukada, Hiroyuki.  “Powhatan and the Fate of the Lost Colonists of Roanoke: Decoding William Strachey’s Imaginary Geography,” North Carolina Historical Review, 98 (January 2021), 42-64.

Wickman, Thomas. “Our Best Places: Gender, Food Sovereignty, and Mianotonomi’s Kin on the Connecticut River,” Early American Studies, 19 (Spring 2021), 215-263.

What You Need To Read, March 2021

If you are reading this, it means you made it through 2021. Though we still have plenty of tough times ahead, I wish you all the best, and hope you find the first quarterly bibliography of this new year of some value. If there is anything I missed and that you would like me to look at, you know how to reach me. Stay safe, everyone, and here’s to hoping 2021 is better than 2020.

Baumgartner, Alice L. “The Massacre at Gracias a Dios: Mobility and Violence on the Lower Rio Grande, 1821-1856,” Western Historical Quarterly, 52 (Spring 2021), 35-58.

Burch, Susan. Committed: Remembering Native Kinship In and Beyond Institutions, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Casteneda, Terri A. Marie Mason Potts: The Lettered Life of a California Indian Activist, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Champagne, Duane and Carole Goldberg. A Coalition of Lineages: The Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, (Tuscon: University of Arizona Press, 2021).

Daggar, Lori. “The Mission Complex: Economic Development, ‘Civilization,’ and Empire in the Early Republic,” Journal of the Early Republic, 36 (September 2016), 467-492.

Eustace, Nicole. Covered With Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice In Early America, (New York: Liveright, 2021).

Fisher, Dennis Leo. “War, Wampum, and Recognition: Algonquin Transborder Political Activism during the Early Twentieth Century, 1919-1931,” American Indian Quarterly, 45 (Winter 2021), 56-79.

Frederick, Jer. “Shifting Sands: Congressman Charlie Rose, Tribal, Federal, and State Politics, and the History of Lumbee Recognition,” North Carolina Historical Review, 97 (October 2021), 401-474.

Gage, Justin. We Do Not Want the Gates Closed Between U: Native Networks and the Spread of the Ghost Dance. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Garrison, Tim Alan.  “Twisting Air: Native Southerners and their Encounters with Tornadoes,” Native South, 13 (2020), 60-93.

Goodman, Linda J. and Helma Swan. Singing the Songs of my Ancestors: The Life and Music of Helma Swan, Makah Elder, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Hahn, Monica Anke. “Pantomime Indian: Performing The Encounter in Robert Sayer’s Harlequin Cherokee,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 78 (January 2021), 117-146.

Heyes, Scott A. “Embracing Indigenous Knowledge: The Spiritual Dimensions of Place,” SiteLINES: A Journal of Place, 16 (Fall 2020), 3-7.

Hoy, Benjamin. A Line of Blood and Dirt: Creating the Canada-United States Border across Indigenous Lands, (New York: Oxford University Press 2021).

Hudson, Angela Pulley. “Removals and Remainder: Apaches and Choctaws in the Jim Crow South,” Journal of the Civil War Era, 11 (March 2021), 80-102.

Janda, Sarah Eppler, Patricia Loughlin, and Renee M. Laegreid, eds. This Land Is Herland: Gendered Activism in Oklahoma, 1870-2010, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Lee, An Anson.  “The Mesilla Guard: Race and Violence in Nineteenth-Century New Mexico,” New Mexico Historical Review, 125 (December 2020), 1752-1763.

Meadows, William C. The First Code-Talkers: Native American Communication in World War I, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Mihesuah, Devon A. Ned Christie: The Creation of an Outlaw and Cherokee Hero, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Oberg, Michael Leroy, ‘Every Drop of Indian Blood’: The Short But Ironic Life of Sylvester Long,” Native South, 13 (2020), 32-59.

O’Neill, Sean.  Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity among the Indians of Northwestern California, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Panich, Lee M.,, George Ann DeAntoni, and Tsim Schneider, “‘By the Aid of his Indians’: Native Negotiations of Settler Colonialism in Marin County, California.” International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 25 (no. 1, 2021), 92-115.

Pauketat, Timothy R. “When the Rains Stopped: Evapotranspiration and Ontology at Ancient Cahokia,” Journal of Anthropological Research, 76 (Winter 2020), 410-438.

Peterson, Dawn.  Indians in the Family: Adoption and the Politics of Antebellum Expansion, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017).

Phillips, Katrina M. Staging Indigeneity: Salvage Tourism and the Performance of Native American History, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Reid, Gerald F. Chief Thunderwater: An Unexpected Indian in Unexpected Places, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Rountree, Helen C. Manteo’s World: Native American Life in Carolina’s Sound Country before            and after the Lost Colony, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021).

Silverman, David J. “Ungrateful Children and Days of Mourning: Two Wampanoag Interpretations of the ‘First Thanksgiving’ and Colonialism through the Centuries,” New England Quarterly, 93 (December 2020), 608-634.

Smith, Andrea Lynn and Nëhdöwes (Randy A. John). “Monuments, Legitimization Ceremonies, and Haudenosaunee Rejection of Sullivan-Clinton Markers,” New York History 101 (Winter 2020/2021). 343-365.

Sousa, Ashley Riley. “Trapped? The Fur Trade and Debt Peonage in Central California,” Pacific Historical Review, 90 (Winter 2021), 1-27.

Spindler, John E. “Slaughter in the Snow,” Military Heritage, 22 (Winter 2021), 62-71.

Taylor, Alan. American Republics: A Continental History of the United States, 1783-1850. (New York: Norton, 2021).

Theobald, Brianna. “Bringing Back Woman Knowledge: The Women’s Dance Health Program and Native Midwifery in the Twin Cities,” Journal of Women’s History, 32 (Winter 2020).

Townshend, Russell, et. al., “Digital Archaeology and the Living Cherokee Landscape,” International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 24 (December 2020), 969-988.

Turner, John G. “The Yoke of Bondage: Slavery in Plymouth Colony,” New England Quarterly, 93 (December 2020), 634-54.

Wallace, Jessica L. “More than ‘Strangers to Each Others Persons & Manners’: Overhill Cherokees and Fort Loudoun,” Native South, 13 (2020), 120-157.

Warde, Mary Jane. George Washington Grayson and the Creek Nation, 1843-1920, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2021).

Washburn, Jeffrey. “Directing Their Own Change: Chickasaw Economic Transformation and the Civilization Program, 1750s-1830s,” Native South, 13 (2020), 94-119.

Watson, Kelly L. “Mary Kittamaquund Brent, “’The Pocahontas of Maryland’: Sex, Marriage, and Diplomacy in the Seventeenth-Century Chesapeake,” Early American Studies, 19 (Winter 2021), 24-63.

Williams, David B.  Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound, (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2021).

Wright, Miller Shores. “’A Man’s Children Have No Claim to his Property’: Creek Matrilineal Property Relations and Gendered Conflict at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century,” Native South, 13 (2020), 158-188.

What You Need to Read, September 2020

Interlibrary loan services have just restarted at my college’s library after this long Covid season. Classes are resuming, some in person, some in a hybrid format, and some entirely online. Here is your quarterly bibliography of what seemed notable to me in the field of Native American history. And, oh, by the way, I have signed a contract for the third edition of Native America which will be co-written with my friend and former student Peter Olsen-Harbich of William and Mary. It should be out by the end of 2022. Enjoy the reading!

Adams, David Wallace. Education for Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875-1928, revised ed., (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2020).

Allard, Amelie. “Relationships and the Creation of Colonial Landscapes in the Eighteenth-Century Fur Trade,” American Indian Quarterly, 44 (Spring 2020), 149-170.

Arnold, Morris S. “The Quapaws and the American Revolution,” Arkansas Historical Quarterly, 79 (Spring 2020), 1-39.

Bigart, Robert J. Providing for the People: Economic Change among the Salish and Kootenai Indians, 1875-1910, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Black, Liza.  Picturing Indians: Native Americans in Film, 1941-1960, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Briggs, Laura.  Taking Children: A History of American Terror, (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2020).

Carmody, Stephen B. and Casey R. Barrier, eds., Shaman, Priest, Practice, Belief: Materials of Ritual and Religion in Eastern North America, (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2020).

Carpenter, Kyle B. “A Failed Venture in the Nueces Strip: Misconceptions and Mismanagement of the Beales Rio Grande Colony, 1832-1836,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, 123 (April 2020), 420-442.

Croce, Francesca. “Indigenous Women Entrepreneurship: Analysis of a Promising Research Theme at the Intersection of Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Women Entrepreneurship.” Ethnic and Racial Studies, 43 (May 2020), 1013-1031.

Denson, Andrew. “Cherokee Ambassador: Gertrude McDaris Ruskin and the Personal Politics of Southern Commemoration,” Georgia Historical Quarterly, 104 (Issue 2, 2020), 127-154.

Dowd, Gregory Evans. “Custom, Text, and Property: Indians, Squatters and Political Authority in Jacksonian Michigan,” Early American Studies, 18 (Spring 2020), 195-228.

Driving Hawk, Edward J. and Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve, Too Strong to be Broken: The Life of Edward J. Driving Hawk, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Eick, Grethen Cassel, They Met at Wounded Knee: The Eastmans’ Story, (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2020).

Ellis, Elizabeth. “The Natchez War Revisited: Violence, Multinational Settlements, and Indigenous Diplomacy in the Lower Mississippi Valley,” William and Mary Quarterly, 77 (July 2020), 441-472.

Erben, Patrick M. “Releasing the Energy of Eighteenth-Century Indigenous Hymnody,” William and Mary Quarterly, 77 (July 2020), 387-392.

Ethridge, Robbie Franklyn and Eric E. Browne, eds., The Historical Turn in Southeastern Archaeology, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2020).

Fisher, Andrew H. “Defenders and Dissidents: Cooks Landing and the Fight to Define Tribal Sovereignty in the Red Power Era,” Comparative American Studies, 17 (No. 2, 2020), 117-141.

Gage, Justin. We Do Not Want the Gates Closed Between Us: Native Networks and the Spread of the Ghost Dance, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Greene, Jerome A. January Moon: The Northern Cheyenne Breakout from Fort Robinson, 1878-1879, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Haake, Claudia B. Modernity through Letter Writing: Cherokee and Seneca Political Representations in Response to Removal, 1830-1857, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Hall, Philip S. and Mary S. Lewis. From Wounded Knee to the Gallows: The Life and Trials of Lakota Chief Two Sticks, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Hernandez, Christopher. “Battle Lines of the North American Southwest: An Inquiry into Prehispanic and Post-Contact Pueblo Tactics of War,” Kiva, 86 (March 2020), 47-69.

Hunziker, Alyssa A. “Playing Indian, Playing Filipino: Native American and Filipino Interactions at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School,” American Quarterly, 72 (June 2020), 423-448.

Jazwa, Christopher S, et. al., “Fishing, Subsistence Change, and Foraging Strategies on Western Santa Rosa Island, California,” American Antiquity, 85 (July 2020) 591-608.

Jenkins, Jessica A. and Martin D. Gallivan. “Shell on Earth: Oyster Harvesting, Consumption, and Deposition Practices in the Powhatan Chesapeake,” Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology, 15 (July-Sept 2020), 384-406.

Kraft, Louis. Sand Creek and the Tragic End of a Lifeway, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Lee, Lloyd.  Diné Identity in the 21st Century World, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2020).

MacKenzie-Jones, Paul. “Sending a Sailor to War: The Ponca Singers, California Hobbyists, Vietnam, and the Rejection of the Counterculture Myth of the New Age Indian,” Great Plains Quarterly 40 (Spring 2020), 117-128.

March, Ray A. Mass Murder in California’s Empty Quarter: A Tale of Tribal Treachery at the Cederville Rancheria, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

McNutt, Charles H and Ryan M. Parish, Cahokia in Context: Hegemony and Diaspora, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2020).

Miller, Robert J., et al. eds. Creating Private Sector Economies in Native America: Sustainable Development through Entrepreneurship, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2020).

Przystupa, Paulina F. “The Archaeology of Native American Boarding Schools in the American Southwest,” Kiva 86 (June 2020), 214-222.

Schwartz, James Z. “Lewis Henry Morgan’s Early Theory of Progress: His Evolving View of the Passions and Social Development,” Early American Studies, 18 (Spring 2020), 229-258.

Spady, James O’Neil. Education and the Racial Dynamics of Settler Colonialism in Early America: Georgia and South Carolina, ca. 1700-1820, (London: Routledge, 2020).

Stone, Ashkan Soltani and Natale A. Zappia, Rez Metal: Inside the Navajo Nation Heavy Metal Scene, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Townsend, Russell, John D. Griffin and Kathryn Sampeck, “Archaeology, Historical Ruptures, and Ani-Kitu Hwagi Memory and Knowledge,” American Indian Quarterly, 44 (Spring 2020), 243-268.

Tuell, Vette Towersap. “Public Lands and American Indians: Traditional use and Off-Reservation Treaty Rights,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 88 (Spring 2020), 115-120.

West, Cane. “’They Have Exercised Every Art’: Ecological Rhetoric, A War of Maps, and Cherokee Sovereignty in the Arkansas Valley, 1812-1828,” Journal of the Early Republic, 40 (Summer 2020), 297-327.

Willard, William, Alan G. Marshall and J. Diane Pearson, Rising from the Ashes: Survival, Sovereignty, and Native America, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Beautiful Scars

I knew nothing about Tom Wilson when I first encountered him at the Abilene, a live music club in Rochester, New York, a couple of years ago. I did not know that he had played in the Juno Award-winning Blackie and the Rodeo Kings. But he appeared at the Abilene under the name LeE HARVeY OsMOND, which was good enough for me. I have often gone to see a band based on its name alone.

Between songs Wilson spoke about his album “Mohawk” and the open secrets he had uncovered about his past. Those stories are fleshed out in more detail in Wilson’s autobiography, Beautiful Scars: Steeltown Secrets, Mohawk Skywalkers, and the Road Home, published in 2017 by Doubleday Canada. I’ve only recently come around to reading it, and I am glad I did.

Wilson’s book contains the sorts of stories one might expect in a rock ‘n’ roll autobiography. He tells us of how he was first turned on by music, formed his first band, and found meaning in performing songs of his own. There are also in these pages stories of drugs, dissipation, and addiction. But there is also here a family story, a moving and at times beautifully written tale of identity, rediscovery, redemption and grace.

He was raised by George and Bunny Wilson in Hamilton, Ontario. He did not look like his parents and they were much older than the parents of his peers. He was adopted, taken in. His biological mother, Janie Lazare, was from a Catholic Mohawk family from Kahnawake. She accompanied a high steel worker from the reserve to New York City, unaware that he was already a married man. She return home pregnant, and made her way in the world as best she could in Toronto and Hamilton. It turned out hat the man she accompanied to the City was not Wilson’s father. Wilson learned later that his real father was a Mohawk named Louis Beauvais. None of that helped Janie. She tried to find an adoptive family for the child but ended up handing him off to Bunny and George, who Wilson says did the best they could. Janie stayed present in his life. “She was always around,” Wilson writes. Janie was Bunny’s sidekick. “She always stood a few feet behind Bunny. Bunny would say her piece and then Janie might respond with a laugh or a head shake or sometimes a few words, words that were often lost in the crowd of conversation buzzing around us.” Janie’s voice, Wilson remembers, was seldom heard, and “there’s plenty of heartbreak in a voice that rarely gets heard.”

It took Wilson decades to sort out the secrets, to understand the connections between the people who had entered his life and crossed his path. Toward the end of the book he writes:

My name is Thomas George Lazare.

I came from a family of Mohawk chiefs. Peacemakers and peacekeepers, fighters and man-eaters. Lacrosse magicians, tobacco salesmen, gangsters, shamans, shit-disturbers and survivors. But instead of growing up around these heroes and zeros, I grew up on the East Mountain in Hamilton….I am a living breathing lie. An embarrassment. A married man’s mistake and a young girl’s only chance to hop a fence out of town and escape to freedom. I was hidden from the world and from myself, my name was changed because it sounded too Indian and my clothes were fitted to look like the other kids.

I’ve been Thomas Cunningham Wilson ever since. An Irish-French kid. Not Indian–No Way. No Indian blood in me. None. Zero.

Later, after meeting his father, he reflected on the process of finding his way back to Kahnawake, now the son of a Mohawk mother. Louis Beauvais, he writes, hinted at their meeting that “I was taken from him. I was supposed to be his.” They talked and they reflected. The past came more clearly into focus. Wilson thought about his family. Beauvais had waited fifty-six years for this homecoming, Wilson said. He was an old man now. So was Wilson. “But I’m here. I’m scared and scarred but I’ve survived. I’m alive and lucky as hell.”

Indigenous identity can be a tricky thing. My students wrestle with the subject when we discuss it in class. Those of us who study the field of history are aware of Pretendians and Poseurs and Wannabes, but also the efforts of government officials to define Native peoples out of existence, of powerful stereotypes and expectations that attempt to limit and define what is authentically “Indian.” Mohawk identity can be especially complicated, with an Indigenous nation that straddles the international boundary between Canada and the United States, that has confronted the efforts of the United States, Canada, New York State, and the provinces of Quebec and Ontario to define who Mohawks are and what they ought to be, while trying at the same time to appropriate their lands, reeducate their children, neuter their sovereignty, and extinguish their culture. Wilson’s biography, of an artist hardly known in the United States, paints a rich and revealing portrait of these many tangled ties. I look forward to using Wilson’s work in class.

What You Need to Read, June 2020

You have finished a rough semester. Libraries are still closed. Some interlibrary loan services are available, and school will return in some form in the fall. Here is your summer reading list to help keep you up to date on what is coming out in Native American History.

Adams, Mikaela Morgan. “‘A Very Serious and Perplexing Epidemic of Grippe,’: The Influenza Epidemic of 1918 at the Haskell Institute,” American Indian Quarterly, 44 (Winter 2020), 1-35.

Bates, Denise E. Basket Diplomacy: Leadership, Alliance-Building, and Resilience among the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, 1884-1984, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Bethke, Brandi. “Revisiting the Horse in Blackfoot Culture: Understanding the Development of Nomadic Pastoralism on the North American Plains,” International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 24 (March 2020), 44-61.

Bigart, Robert J. Providing for the People: Economic Change Among the Salish and Kootenai Indians, 1875-1910 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Bigart, Robert and Joseph McDonald, “You Seem To Like Our MOney, and We Like Our Country”: A Documentary History of the Salish, Pend d’Oreille, and Kootenai Indians, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020.

Blanton, Dennis B. Conquistador’s Wake: Tracking the Legacy of Hernando de Soto in the Indigenous Southeast, (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2020).

Britten, Thomas A. and Charles Trimble. Voice of the Tribes: A History of the National Tribal Chairmen’s Association, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Cahill, Cathleen D. “‘Our Democracy and the American Indian’: Citizenship, Sovereignty, and the Native Vote in the 1920s,” Journal of Women’s History 32 (Spring 2020), 41-51.

Carr, Kurt W., et. al, eds. The Archaeology of Native Americans in Pennsylvania, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020).

DeCoster, Jonathan. Conflict and Accommodation in Colonial New Mexico, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020).

Duwe, Samuel. Tewa Worlds: An Archaeological History of Being and Becoming Pueblo in the Southwest, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2020).

Gage, Justin. We Do Not Want the Gates Closed Between Us: Native Networs and the Spread of the Ghost Dance, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Gagnon, Celese Marie and Sara K. Becker, “Native Lies in Colonial Times: Insights from Skeletal Remains of Susquehannocks, 1575-1675,” Historical Archaeology, 54 (March 2020), 262-285

Galler, Robert W., Jr., “Converting the Missionaries: The Transformation of Benedictine Priests at Crow Creek,” South Dakota History, 50 (Spring 2020), 48-79.

Glassow, Michael A., et al., Goleta Slough Prehistory: Insights Gained from a Vanishing Archaeological Record, (Santa Barbara: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History 2020).

Hall, Philip S. and Mary Solon Lewis. From Wounded Knee to the Gallows: The Life and Trials of Lakota Chief Two Sticks, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

Hall, Ryan. Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2020).

Headman, Louis, and Sean O’Neill, Walks on the Ground: A Tribal History of the Ponca Nation, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Hedren, Paul. L. “Who Killed Crazy Horse? A Historiographical Review and Affirmation,” Nebraska History, 101 (Spring 2020 ), 2-17.

Hilbert, Vi, Haboo: Native American Stories from Puget Sound, 2nd ed., (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2020).

Humalajoki, Reetta. “‘Yours in Indian Unity’: Moderate National Indigenous Organizations and the US -Canada Border in the Red Power Era,” Comparative American Studies, 17 (no. 2, 2020), 183-198.

Johnson, Andrew D. and Carolyn Arena. “Building Dutch Suriname in English Carolina: Aristocratic Networks, Native Enslavement, and Plantation Provisioning in the Seventeenth-Century Americas,” Journal of Southern History, 86 (February 2020), 37-74.

Killsback, Leo. A Sacred People: Indigenous Governance, Traditional Leadership, and the Warriors of the Cheyenne Nation, (Lubbock: Texas Tech University Press, 2020).

Lappas, Thomas John. In League Against King Alcohol: Native American Women and the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, 1874-1933, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

McNally, Michael David. Defend the Sacred: Native American Religious Freedom Beyond the First Amendment, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2020).

Michna, Gregory. “The Long Road to Sainthood: Indian Christians, the Doctrine of Preparation, and the Halfway Covenant of 1662,” Church History, 89 (March 2020), 43-73.

Navin, John J. The Grim Years: Settling South Carolina, 1670-1720, (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2020).

Nielsen, Marianne O. and Karen Jarratt-Snider, eds. Traditional, National, and International Law and Indigenous Communities, (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2020).

Ruediger, Dylan. “‘Neither Utterly to Reject Them, Nor Yet to Drawe Them to Come In’: Tributary Subordination and Settler Colonialism in Virginia,” Early American Studies, 18 (Wintero 2020), 1-31.

Saunt, Claudio. Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory, (New York: Norton, 2020).

Senier, Siobahn, Sovereignty and Sustainability: Indigenous Literary Stewardship in New England, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Silverman, David J. “Living with the Past: Thoughts on Community Collaboration and Difficult History in Native American and Indigenous Studies,” American Historical Review, 125 (April 2020), 519-527. Be sure to read as well the replies to Silverman’s review by Alyssa Mt. Pleasant, Philip Deloria, Jean M. O’Brien, and Christine De Lucia.

Stofferahn, Steven A. “‘Down Too Deep’: Father Pius Boehm, From Reluctant Missionary to Devoted Caretaker at Crow Creek, 1887-1935,” South Dakota History 50 (Spring 2020), 25-47.

Thornton, Russell and Jamie Geronimo Vela, comps., NAGPRA and the Repatriation of Native American Human Remains and Cultural Objects, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020).

Timmerman, Nicholas A. “Contested Indigenous Landscapes: Indian Mounds and the Political Creation of the Mythical ‘Mound Builder’ Race,” Ethnohistory, 67 (January 2020), 75-95.

Toth, Gyorgy. “‘Red’ Nations: Marxists and the Native American Sovereignty Movement of the Late Cold War,” Cold War History, 20 (May 2020), 197-221.

White, A. J., et. al., “After Cahokia: Indigenous Repopulation and Depopulation of the Horseshoe Lake Watershed, AD 1400-1900,” American Antiquity, 85 (April 2020), 263-278.

Woodard, Buck. “An Alternative to Red Power: Political Alliance as Tribal Activism in Virgina,” Comparative American Studies, 17 (no. 2, 2020), 142-166.