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Month: October 2016

Earn Big Money. Become a Historian

Earn Big Money. Become a Historian

Many students are getting advice that they ought to major in something useful, or practical, and that history and the other liberal arts are luxuries that really add little of value.  Fortunately, the historical profession has begun to push back against this sort of nonsense, as in this nice essay by Jacob Anbinder.

Red Lives Matter

Red Lives Matter

NPR’s Story Corps project aired this morning the story of woodcarver John T. Williams, gunned down by a Seattle police officer in 2010.  Williams was carrying his carving knife as he crossed a street.  Deaf in one ear, he did not respond to the officer’s command to drop his knife, and the officer opened fire in a matter of seconds.  As in so many recent stories of police shootings of people of color, no charges were filed against the officer. …

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The Presidential Debates and Native American Rights

The Presidential Debates and Native American Rights

Neither Governor Pence nor Senator Kaine had anything to say about the rights of native people, the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the challenges faced by Native communities, and that is unlikely to change in either of the two remaining scheduled presidential debates.  It is worthwhile, then, to read the party platforms and compare the Republicans’ proposals resting upon commercial development in Indian Country and the elimination of federal “red tape” that makes this development difficult (see pages 36 and 37 of the…

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Conference Announced

Conference Announced

Richard Hakluyt the Younger compiled the sources that allow historians to understand the encounter in the sixteenth century between English explorers, mariners, and traders, and a host of native peoples across several continents. Oxford University will host a conference sponsored by the Hakluyt Society in November commemorating the 400th anniversary of Hakluyt’s death.  I will be presenting, as will Joyce Lorimer, Carla Rahn Phillips, and many others.

Andrew Jackson’s Removal from the Twenty-Dollar Bill

Andrew Jackson’s Removal from the Twenty-Dollar Bill

The Treasury Department recently announced its decision to remove Andrew Jackson from the front of the twenty-dollar bill, a decision justified by Jackson’s slaveholding and the large role he played in the odious policy known as “Indian Removal.” Jackson certainly bears responsibility for the removal of tens of thousands of Native American people from their homes in the eastern United States to new homes in the west.  He signed the Indian Removal Bill into law in 1830, presented Indians with…

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